Spanish city transforms church into vibrant skate park

August 2, 2018  |   World
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A disused church in the Spanish city of llanera has been given a new lease of secular life. The church was designed by a Spanish architect Manuel del Busto in 1912. During the Spanish Civil War (1936 to 1939) it became part of a complex that housed workers in an explosive factory, according to the organizers. After the end of the Spanish Civil War, the factory was closed and abandoned and a few years ago the church was acquired by a group of friends who decided to make it into a real skate park.

The church, located in Llanera, Asturias, was converted into a skate park by a collective called the Church Brigade. The more than 100-year-old church was turned into a community space with the addition of a skateboard ramp, and became a popular site with local skaters. Photo by Lucho Vidales

The church, located in Llanera, Asturias, was converted into a skate park by a collective called the Church Brigade. The more than 100-year-old church was turned into a community space with the addition of a skateboard ramp, and became a popular site with local skaters.

First, it was turned into a skate park by La Iglesia Skate. Next, the artist Okuda San Migue turned the walls and domed ceilings of the church into a bright, isometric, paintings. Vibrant murals surround the space, while wrapping the interior in a mesmerizing artwork. Okuda San Miguel is a Madrid-based artist whose work has appeared around the world, both in galleries and on the streets. “[Miguel’s] iconic artistic piece Kaos Star represents a colorful and isometric rose of the winds that tries to tell us that it does not matter were you are, or what you are doing, what matters are your own goals.”  The church is open to skaters who want to try out the ramps or for those who want to check out the urban art. 

Named Kaos Temple, the space was made with the help of Red Bull.

Located in the north of Spain, the church is open to skaters who want to try out the ramps or for those who want to check out the urban art. Photo by Lucho Vidales

Interested in more information about public art & skate parks?

See in the July 2015 post by the Greater Des Moines Public Art Foundation.

Also, Jeff Ihaza’s New York Times article, Skateboarders Won, posted April 7, 2018, looks at skate parks as a defining piece of the modern urban landscape. Ihaza writes that skate parks are booming everywhere around the world. And, exciting news is that for the first time, skateboarding is entering the Olympics Games in 2020!



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