Constantin Brâncuși — born on this day!

February 19, 2016  |   Feature
Share This Page

One of the most influential sculptors of the 20th century, Constantin Brâncuși, was born on this day, February 19, 1876, in Romania. He died in Paris in 1957.

Brâncuși photographed in his workshop. The artist bequeathed part of his collection to the French state on condition that his workshop be rebuilt as it was on the day he died. This reconstruction of his studio, adjacent to the Pompidou Centre in Paris, is open to the public.

On of Brâncuși’s most famous public art projects is the sculptural ensemble at Târgu Jiu, where he spent much of his childhood. Finished in 1938, it is an homage to the Romanian heroes of World War I.  The ensemble comprises three sculptures: the Table of Silence, the Gate of the Kiss and the The Infinity Column, on an axis 4,250 feet (1,300 m) long, oriented west to east. The Ensemble is considered to be one of the great works of 20th century outdoor sculpture.

The "Gate of the Kiss," of Banpotoc travertine (marble), features a kiss motif on the gate pillars. The transition to another life occurs through the "Gate of Kiss."
The “Gate of the Kiss,” of Banpotoc travertine (marble), features a kiss motif on the gate pillars. The transition to another life occurs through the “Gate of Kiss.”

 

 

The Infinity Column symbolizes the concept of Infinity and the infinite sacrifice of the Romanian soldiers. It is considered by Sydnei Geist the top point of the modern Art. The Infinity Column stacks 17 rhomboidal modules, with a half-unit at the top. The incomplete top unit is thought to be the element that expresses the concept of the infinite.
The Infinity Column symbolizes the concept of Infinity and the infinite sacrifice of the Romanian soldiers. It is considered by Sydnei Geist the top point of the modern Art. The Infinity Column stacks 17 rhomboidal modules, with a half-unit at the top. The incomplete top unit is thought to be the element that expresses the concept of the infinite.

 

The "Table of Silence" is a circular stone table surrounded by 12 hourglass-seats, which symbolize time. The "Table" represents the moment before the battle on which the combatants were going to participate. Nevertheless, the seats are not located close to the edges of the table.
The “Table of Silence” is a circular stone table surrounded by 12 hourglass-seats, which symbolize time. The “Table” represents the moment before the battle on which the combatants were going to participate. Nevertheless, the seats are not located close to the edges of the table.

 

 

About the Artist

Called the patriarch of modern sculpture, Constantin Brâncuși developed his career in France. Formal studies took him first to Bucharest, then to Munich, then to Paris from 1905 to 1907. Brâncuși sought inspiration in non-European cultures, but other influences emerge from Romanian folk art traceable through Byzantine and Dionysian traditions.

The style of Brâncuși is one that “was largely fueled by myths, folklore, and primitive culture,” this combined with the modern materials and tools Brâncuși used to sculpt, “formed a unique contrast…resulting in a distinctive kind of modernity and timelessness.”

Des Moines, Iowa is fortunate to have Brâncuși’s dazzling 1912 sculpture Maiastraa magic bird from Russian folklore that embodies a theme that fascinated the artist for more than three-decades.

 

 



Share your thoughts about this with us.

Comments

comments




Greater Des Moines Public Art Foundation

Send this to friend