April 15, 2014

On the Walkway: Public Art

“The very best public art fits seamlessly into the surroundings, serving a functional purpose while also providing an artistic experience for those that stop to enjoy it”, wrote a blog of “Tokyo’s 7 coolest public art pieces”

The boundary between a walkway and an adjacent artificial pond was chosen as the location for the work. This interface between “liquid” (water) and “solid” (land) was thematically used and augmented by the question of “real” (water ripples) and “virtual” (artificial light waves).

The boundary between a walkway and an adjacent artificial pond was chosen as the location for the work. This interface between “liquid” (water) and “solid” (land) was thematically used and augmented by the question of “real” (water ripples) and “virtual” (artificial light waves).

The person continued, “An excellent recent example is a piece in Shinagawa [pictured above] that unobtrusively uses LED screens and weight sensors to make an interactive artwork out of a simple walkway to the station. The glass tiles over the LED screens are equipped with load cells measuring the exact position and power of each footstep, triggering corresponding virtual waves on the screens that continue as actual waves in the adjacent pond. It’s an entrancing synthesis of the virtual and actual worlds with you as the nexus, or—if you are late for your train—it’s not a big statue getting in your way.”

This public art project, called Duality (2006), was developed by ART+COM, an non-profit organisation to explore the new mediums applied possibilities in the fields of art, design, science and technology. Ranging from artistic installations and design-focused projects to technological innovations and inventions, ART+COM’s work includes different kinds of formats: Autoactive, reactive and interactive objects and installations, media-based environments and architectures. Here is ART+COM’s site:

Duality

April 4, 2014

Public Art Creates Social Space Both Physical and Virtual

Janet Echelman creates delicate, fluttering nets for the sky, aerial sculptures at the scale of skyscrapers.

This month (March 2014) on the occasion of the 30th TED Conference in Vancouver, though, she created her largest work to date.

Spanning 745 feet and hung 24 stories overhead near the city's convention center, it's twice as large as anything she's made previously. But it has one other critical difference. It allowed the public to play. During the day, the piece appeared more gauzy and fine, blending with the skies and clouds and capturing the subtle movements of the wind in its ripples and folds, at least in the video documentation created for the ephemeral piece, which was up for a week through March 22. It's made from 145 miles of soft, braided fiber, a material that's 15 times stronger than steel by weight.

Spanning 745 feet and hung 24 stories overhead near the city’s convention center, it’s twice as large as anything she’s made previously. But it has one other critical difference. It allowed the public to play.
During the day, the piece appeared more gauzy and fine, blending with the skies and clouds and capturing the subtle movements of the wind in its ripples and folds, at least in the video documentation created for the ephemeral piece, which was up for a week through March 22. It’s made from 145 miles of soft, braided fiber, a material that’s 15 times stronger than steel by weight.

The sculpture is effectively a distributed website, a single, full-screen Google Chrome window 10 million pixels wide, projected onto the overlapping, moving layers of net via five bright projectors. Users were given very fine control of what kind of mark-making they wanted to create and where it would appear on the sculpture via the Chrome-based app.

“When you look at the sculpture, you’re looking at a browser,” Koblin says in this video.

March 31, 2014

If you’re in Paris…

Bill Viola is without doubt the most celebrated exponent of video art. For the first time, the Grand Palais in Paris, France, will present a wide-ranging group of his works, including moving paintings and monumental installations from 1977 to today.

Organized by the Réunion des musées nationaux - Grand Palais in collaboration with Bill Viola Studio.

Organized by the Réunion des musées nationaux – Grand Palais in collaboration with Bill Viola Studio.

tristans-ascension-560px

See more.

March 23, 2014

Swings on the Streets

21 Balançoires (21 Swings) is a 2012 project by Canadian design collective Daily Tous Les Jours, known for their wide variety of interactive public installations and experiences. Surrounded on both sides by a new music complex and science center, designers Mouna Andraos and Melissa Mongiat chose to bridge the gap between the two by converting a narrow strip of land into an enormous interactive instrument.

Pre-recorded sounds from a xylophone, piano, and other instruments were programmed into color-coded swings that when in use play various notes, however when swung in unison with careful cooperation, more complex melodies and harmonies arise. An additional “secret mode” was programmed to only play when all 21 swings were in use.

©MartineDoyon

©MartineDoyon

What a fun idea!!!

March 14, 2014

Public Art Marks Asian Art Week

A work by India’s foremost contemporary artist Subodh Gupta has been installed in front of the Rockefeller Centre in New York to mark the Asian Art Week.

Subodh Gupta, Spill, 2007, Stainless steel and stainless steel utensils, 170 x 145h x 95 cm.

Subodh Gupta, Spill, 2007, Stainless steel and stainless steel utensils, 170 x 145h x 95 cm.

The Spill, which consists of a stainless steel bucket spilling over in excess with lunch boxes, glasses and bowls, is estimated at $300,000-500,000 by Christie’s auction house. The installation, was set up for the preview of the South Asian Modern + Contemporary Art sale by Christie’s on March 18. The sculpture, installed in the prestigious Manhattan complex since March 11 will be at the spot till the day of the sale. Gupta’s Spill was the first work of the Southeast Asian art sales to be installed outside Rockefeller Centre, according to Christie’s. Gupta’s mid-career retrospective is currently on view at the National Gallery of Modern Art in New Delhi.

Gupta's cascading mass of stainless steel culinary utensils is frozen mid-avalanche. The highly reflective, sterile steel surface visually emulates the ironic seduction of a natural disaster. Photo: christoph-hermann.com

Gupta’s cascading mass of stainless steel culinary utensils is frozen mid-avalanche. The highly reflective, sterile steel surface visually emulates the ironic seduction of a natural disaster. Photo: christoph-hermann.com

Subodh Gupta's giant sculpture is of a bucket on a rusted metal plinth, with continuously overflowing water. This work comments on the constant usage and wastage of water as a global problem, but specifically in Delhi, where water scarcity is a severe concern and becomes increasingly apparent as water levels drop each year.

Subodh Gupta’s giant sculpture is of a bucket on a rusted metal plinth, with continuously overflowing water. This work comments on the constant usage and wastage of water as a global problem, but specifically in Delhi, where water scarcity is a severe concern and becomes increasingly apparent as water levels drop each year.

March 13, 2014

Public Art that Surprises and Fascinates

Alice Aycock unveils a suite of seven enormous sculptures in aluminum and fiberglass. Called “Park Avenue Paper Chase,” and stretching from 52nd Street to 66th in New York City, this public art project was inspired variously by tornadoes, dance movements and drapery folds, and will be in view until July 20, 2014.

“Cyclone Twist,” an Alice Aycock public art installation, being assembled along Park Avenue., New York City. Photo credit: Richard Perry, The New York Times

“Cyclone Twist,” an Alice Aycock public art installation, being assembled along Park Avenue., New York City. Photo credit: Richard Perry, The New York Times

#dsmpublicart

March 8, 2014

RE-ENVISIONING NEIGHBORHOODS: Theaster Gates

Theaster Gates talks about the artist as catalyst and change agent in communities.

Theaster Gates (front and center) is part of a generation engaged in what has come to be called “social practice”: art that flourishes outside galleries and museums and welcomes all, opening dialogues with those who live beyond its precincts. Encompassing social service, community building, object-making, and real-time discussion around economic inequity, it’s social activism through art-­making. Though the movement is well established in Europe and South America, it has only recently been on the rise in the United States and, not incidentally, just as the art market has shot to previously unseen levels.

Theaster Gates (front and center) is part of a generation engaged in what has come to be called “social practice”: art that flourishes outside galleries and museums and welcomes all, opening dialogues with those who live beyond its precincts. Encompassing social service, community building, object-making, and real-time discussion around economic inequity, it’s social activism through art-­making. Though the movement is well established in Europe and South America, it has only recently been on the rise in the United States and, not incidentally, just as the art market has shot to previously unseen levels.

March 7, 2014

Ekeberg Sculpture Park in Oslo, Norway

Have you seen the sculpture park in Oslo? Ekeberg Sculpture Park is filled with works by some of the biggest names in contemporary art. Marina Abramovic, James Turrell, Jenny Holzer and Louise Bourgeois are just a few of the artists whose pieces are now scattered through Ekeberg Park, which overlooks the city.

The hilly area is about the same size as Oslo’s other famous park, the Vigeland Sculpture Park, and is inspired by similar international facilities, such as Louisiana outside Copenhagen, Kröller-Müller Museum in the Netherlands, and Storm King Sculpture Park ouside New York.

Sarah Sze, Still Life With Landscape (foreground) and Per Inge Bjørlo, Indre Rom VI - Livsløpet (background). Photograph: Ivar Kvaa

Sarah Sze, Still Life With Landscape (foreground) and Per Inge Bjørlo, Indre Rom VI – Livsløpet (background). Photograph: Ivar Kvaa

The park, which is free and open 24 hours a day, is the brainchild of Norwegian art collector and philanthropist Christian Ringnes. He has spent nearly £31m of his own money creating an open-air museum.

Photo of artist James Turrell during the construction of the Ekeberg Skyspace. Photograph: Ivar Kvaal

Photo of artist James Turrell during the construction of the Ekeberg Skyspace. Photograph: Ivar Kvaal

March 6, 2014

An Extraordinary Idea for Public Art

The underbelly of a major Vancouver bridge is going to be transformed with a jaw-dropping piece of public art: a massive chandelier, made of polymer and LED lights, that will actually spin. he public art project was approved by Vancouver’s Public Art Committee and announced by developer Westbank Projects Corp.

Created by renowned artist Rodney Graham, the faux-crystal, 18th century chandelier will be installed under the Granville Street Bridge, which leads in and out of the city's downtown core.

Created by renowned artist Rodney Graham, the faux-crystal, 18th century chandelier will be installed under the Granville Street Bridge, which leads in and out of the city’s downtown core.

“Hanging in the cathedral-like space of the bridge’s northern viaduct, directly over Beach Avenue, the chandelier is conceived to slowly rotate as it ascends,” explained a press release from Westbank. “Then, once a day at a fixed time, it will release and spin rapidly, descending back to its starting point, coming to rest halfway to the road below.”

Rodney Graham was born in Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada in 1949. His work draws on literature, philosophy, music, cinema, and art history to conjure uncanny manifestations of culture through visual quotation and disguise. Graham studied at the University of British Columbia and under Ian Wallace at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. His work has been the focus of many international solo exhibitions, at institutions such as Museum der Moderne (Salzburg, 2011), Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (2010), and the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume (Paris, 2009). Graham is also a practicing musician; he lives and works in Vancouver.