March 21, 2015

Anish Kapoor’s installation stands out in India’s Biennale

Anish Kapoor's endless black whirlpool has been spiraling like an angry vortex in the floor of the Aspinwall House in Fort Kochi, India since December 2014.

Anish Kapoor’s endless black whirlpool has been spiraling like an angry vortex in the floor of the Aspinwall House in Fort Kochi, India since December 2014.


Anish Kapoor’s Descension, a water vortex made by the famous artist Anish Kapoor, is an installation that is exclusive to Kochi Biennale as the artist has used a portion of Aspinwall to create an artificial vortex filled with water and diesel, confronting the visitor with a perpetual force that pulls him to the unknowable interior.
Kapoor (born in 1954 in Mumbai, India) lives and works in London, UK; he is one of 94 artists from 30 countries participating in the Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2014 in India, which ends March 29, 2015.

Kapoor (born in 1954 in Mumbai, India) lives and works in London, UK; he is one of 94 artists from 30 countries participating in the Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2014 in India, which ends March 29, 2015.

Kapoor talks about his art in this interview recorded at the Biennale.

March 11, 2015

Doris Salcedo’s Powerful Retrospective at the MCA Chicago Through May 24

Despite strong reviews and a presence in leading museum collections, Doris Salcedo’s work has not had much exposure in the United States until now.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago is presenting the first retrospective of the work of renowned sculptor Doris Salcedo (Colombian, b. 1958). Salcedo—who lives and works in Bogotá—gained prominence in the 1990s for her fusion of postminimalist forms with sociopolitical concerns. The exhibition features all major bodies of work from the artist’s thirty-year career—most of which have never been shown together before.

Doris Salcedo, "Noviembre 6 y 7," 2000. Installation at Palace of Justice, Bogotá, Colombia. Courtesy Alexander and Bonin, New York. © Doris Salcedo.

Doris Salcedo, “Noviembre 6 y 7,” 2000. Installation at Palace of Justice, Bogotá, Colombia. Courtesy Alexander and Bonin, New York. © Doris Salcedo.

Doris Salcedo knows well art’s inability to effect social change. Her sculptures and installations, as powerful as they are, will not change the course of history in her native Colombia, end wars, or stop the drain of everyday violence. In the artist’s view, they are merely mute objects, with no agency in and of themselves. Their power, however, lies in their silence, and in the affective space between object and viewer, drawing out a feeling of collective loss and shared humanity, while pointing to humanity’s greatest tragedies: war, mass displacement, and genocide.

For more information: Doris Salcedo

March 5, 2015

Des Moines, IA is 1 of 12 Finalist Cities for $1-Million Public Art Challenge

5 March 2015: Bloomberg Philanthropies announced that Des Moines, Iowa is one of 12 cities in the running to receive up to $1-million in funding for public art projects that address civic topics. Des Moines was among the 237 U.S. cities that applied from 45 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

The Public Art Challenge is a new program aimed at supporting temporary public art projects that engage communities, enhance creativity, and enrich the vibrancy of cities. Bloomberg Philanthropies invited mayors of U.S. cities with 30,000 residents or more to submit proposals for innovative temporary public art projects that address a civic issue, and demonstrate close collaboration between artists or arts organizations and city government.

“At a time when imaginative ideas are redefining every industry, cities increasingly realize how important it is to embrace and encourage creativity,” said Michael R. Bloomberg. “There was a great response to the challenge we issued, and we hope these projects spur new excitement about the ways public art can strengthen neighborhoods, inspire residents and fuel local economies.”

Des Moines’s proposal called Listening to Water calls attention to Local River Ecology and Urban Water Trails. The City of Des Moines proposes to create art projects along its public waterways to engage the community in dialogue about local river ecology. Partnering with the GREATER DES MOINES PUBLIC ART FOUNDATION, these art projects will aim to explore urban water trails, watershed planning and river space.

Submissions were evaluated on their potential viability as dynamic public art projects, capacity to establish or strengthen public-private partnerships, inclusion of strong audience engagement strategies, and commitment to evaluating outcomes and impact on the host city.

Cities of all sizes applied: nearly 50% of the 237 submissions were from cities with populations between 30,000 and 100,000, 38% had populations between 100,000 and 500,000, and 13% of the applicant cities had over 500,000 residents. A variety of artistic disciplines were represented amongst the applications: 61% of the proposed public art projects involved visual art, 19% combined multiple disciplines, 17% featured digital media, and 3% were performing art projects.

The Public Art Challenge grant will cover development, execution and project related expenditures but will not fund 100% of project costs.

The grant is intended to provide catalytic funds as part of a strong, committed consortium of supporters. At least three winning cities will be selected in May to execute their projects over a maximum of 24 months.

More information about the Public Art Challenge, including links to images and maps can be found here.

February 16, 2015

Mega TV-montage The Clock debuts in the West at the Art Gallery of Alberta

Christian Ernest Marclay (born 11 January 1955) is a Swiss and American visual artist and composer. At the 2011 Venice Biennale, representing the United States of America, Marclay was recognised as the best artist in the official exhibition, winning the Golden Lion for The Clock, a 24-hour compilation of time-related scenes from movies that debuted at London's White Cube gallery in 2010. Newsweek responded by naming Marclay one of the ten most important artists of today. Accepting the Golden Lion, Marclay invoked Andy Warhol, thanking the jury "for giving The Clock its fifteen minutes".

Christian Ernest Marclay (born 11 January 1955) is a Swiss and American visual artist and composer. At the 2011 Venice Biennale, representing the United States of America, Marclay was recognised as the best artist in the official exhibition, winning the Golden Lion for The Clock, a 24-hour compilation of time-related scenes from movies that debuted at London’s White Cube gallery in 2010. Newsweek responded by naming Marclay one of the ten most important artists of today. Accepting the Golden Lion, Marclay invoked Andy Warhol, thanking the jury “for giving The Clock its fifteen minutes”.

Alberta, Canada until April 12, 2015: In an era when checking the time often involves consulting a device that is proficient at enticing us to waste it, Christian Marclay’s tour de force installation The Clock offers a long, luxurious diversion. The artist Marclay (and researchers) spent three years amassing clips from film and TV to create a 24-hour looped video that represents every minute of all 24 hours, unfolding in real time, essentially functioning as an actual clock.

February 5, 2015

Foundation Announces 2015 Officers, New Board Members and Emeritus Trustees

The Greater Des Moines Public Art Foundation welcomed its leadership for 2015 at a board meeting held January 28 in Des Moines. Katherine M. Murphy, Vice President, Community Affairs Officer of Wells Fargo in Iowa was elected the Foundation’s President. Tim R. Hickman, AIA, LEED® AP, Principal of substance ARCHITECTURE in Des Moines was elected Vice President. Ted M. Stuart, President of Architectural Arts, Inc. in Des Moines was elected Secretary and Treasurer.

“The Greater Des Moines Public Art Foundation has made significant progress in accomplishing its goal of making Greater Des Moines a ‘world class’ destination for public art. The recent additions of public art throughout our community contribute to the cultural environment that is being recognized throughout the world,” said Kathy Murphy, president. “And, the Foundation’s plans for upcoming projects, both temporary and long-term, are very exciting too! Stay tuned for more great works!”

In addition to the Foundation leadership, two new board members were appointed. Susan E. Fitzsimmons, Vice President and General Counsel, Ruan Transport Corporation in Des Moines, and Khalid A. Kahn, Principal, Neumann Munson Architects in Des Moines were welcomed to the board for a three-year term.

The Greater Des Moines Public Art Foundation Nominating Committee selected two former board members for Emeritus status on the Board of Directors, based on their distinguished service, active participation, engagement and philanthropic support during their board terms. The new Emeritus board directors are G. David Hurd, Chairman Emeritus, Principal Financial Group and community leader, and Paul Mankins, FAIA Leed® AP, Principal of substance ARCHITECTURE in Des Moines. These members have served three terms on the Board of Directors, nine years total for each.

A complete listing of the GDMPAF Board of Directors with brief bios.

January 22, 2015

Ode to Joy

Here is a flashmob performing one of the best-known works of the repertoire of classical music: Ode an die Freude (Ode to Joy) Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No.9. The symphony was the first example of a major composer using voices in a symphony. Among critics, it is almost universally considered to be Beethoven’s greatest work, and is considered by many to be the greatest piece of western music ever written!

In 2001, Beethoven’s autograph score of the Ninth Symphony was added to the United Nations World Heritage List, becoming the first musical score to be so honored. The Philharmonic Society of London originally commissioned the symphony in 1817, when Beethoven was 47-years old. The main composition work was done between autumn 1822 and the completion of the autograph in February 1824. It celebrates a rich and interesting history since its premiered in Vienna in 1824. Today, it stands as one of the most played symphonies in the world.

January 19, 2015

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

1.19.2015: Martin Luther King, Jr. was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism in the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law.

"I Have a Dream" is a public speech delivered by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on August 28, 1963, in which he calls for an end to racism in the United States. Delivered to over 250,000 civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, the speech was a defining moment of the American Civil Rights Movement.

“I Have a Dream” is a public speech delivered by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on August 28, 1963, in which he calls for an end to racism in the United States. Delivered to over 250,000 civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, the speech was a defining moment of the American Civil Rights Movement.

The national Martin Luther King Day of Service was started by former Pennsylvania U.S. Senator Harris Wofford and Atlanta Congressman John Lewis, who co-authored the King Holiday and Service Act. The federal legislation challenges Americans to transform the King Holiday into a day of citizen action volunteer service in honor of Dr. King. This federal holiday in Dr. King’s honor was officially observed in all 50 states for the first time in 2000.

The centerpiece for the memorial is based on a line from King's "I Have A Dream" speech: "Out of a mountain of despair, a stone of hope."  A 30 feet (9.1 m) high relief of Dr. King named the "Stone of Hope" stands past two other pieces of granite that symbolize the "mountain of despair."

The centerpiece for the memorial is based on a line from King’s “I Have A Dream” speech: “Out of a mountain of despair, a stone of hope.” A 30 feet (9.1 m) high relief of Dr. King named the “Stone of Hope” stands past two other pieces of granite that symbolize the “mountain of despair.”

Visitors figuratively "pass through" the Mountain of Despair on the way to the Stone of Hope, symbolically "moving through the struggle as Dr. King did during his life."   The memorial is located on a 4-acre (1.6 ha) site in West Potomac Park that borders the Tidal Basin, southwest of the National Mall. The memorial is near the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and is intended to create a visual "line of leadership" from the Lincoln Memorial, on whose steps King gave his "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, to the Jefferson Memorial.

Visitors figuratively “pass through” the Mountain of Despair on the way to the Stone of Hope, symbolically “moving through the struggle as Dr. King did during his life.” The memorial is located on a 4-acre (1.6 ha) site in West Potomac Park that borders the Tidal Basin, southwest of the National Mall. The memorial is near the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and is intended to create a visual “line of leadership” from the Lincoln Memorial, on whose steps King gave his “I Have a Dream” speech at the March on Washington, to the Jefferson Memorial.

ap_mlk_memorial_quote_560px

One place outside the United States where Martin Luther King Jr. Day is observed with equal importance is in the Japanese city of Hiroshima under mayor Tadatoshi Akiba, who holds a special banquet at the mayor’s office as an act of unifying his city’s call for peace with King’s message of human rights.

January 2, 2015

A Certain Slant of Light: Temporary Public Art

Among the sunniest public artworks on view now through August 23, 2015 in New York is American artist Spencer Finch’s (b. 1962) “A Certain Slant of Light” at the Morgan Library & Museum.

There’s a certain Slant of light
Winter Afternoons—
That oppresses, like the Heft
Of Cathedral Tunes—

So goes the first stanza of “There’s a certain Slant of light,” Emily Dickinson’s doleful poem which addresses light as a suspect entity—a presence weighing down on those who observe its behavior. The light Dickinson describes, or some quality of it, now fills the Morgan Library and Museum’s cavernous Gilbert Court where artist Spencer Finch has created a site-specific installation named for Dickinson’s poem and further inspired by the Morgan’s collection of medieval Books of Hours.

The installation is inspired by the Morgan Library's great collection of medieval Books of Hours—beautiful, hand-painted works that served as personal prayer books for different times of the day and different periods of the year. Taking advantage of the Morgan's four-story, glass-enclosed courtyard, the artist applied films of color to the windows and hang additional glass panes in the center of the courtyard to create a kind of calendar based on the movement of the sun.

The installation is inspired by the Morgan Library’s great collection of medieval Books of Hours—beautiful, hand-painted works that served as personal prayer books for different times of the day and different periods of the year. Taking advantage of the Morgan’s four-story, glass-enclosed courtyard, the artist applied films of color to the windows and hang additional glass panes in the center of the courtyard to create a kind of calendar based on the movement of the sun. Image Caption: © The Morgan Library & Museum, Photography by Graham S. Haber, 2014, Artwork © Spencer Finch, 2014.

For this immersive installation, Finch covered many of the glass panes of the museum’s airy four-story atrium with rectangular sheets of translucent colored film. Suspended high overhead in the middle of the space is a set of clear glass squares, each freely turning in response to ambient air currents. As they turn, they reflect the sunlight filtered through the colored films, creating a crystalline, prismatic play of colors.

December 22, 2014

Iowa’s High Trestle Trail Bridge Graces Cover of American for the Arts

Americans for the Arts, which serves a network of organizations and individuals, has just released its 2015–2017 strategic plan with a key focus on building recognition for the transformative power of the arts in all of our lives and communities in new ways.

The report cover features High Trestle Trail Bridge, a project by artist David B. Dahlquist and a team of designers from RDG Planning & Design, Iowa.

stratplan

Located northwest of Des Moines, Iowa, the High Trestle Bridge spans the banks of the Des Moines River Valley and is located between the rural communities of Woodward and Madrid.

The "portals" or vertical elements that form a gateway to the Des Moines River Bridge are sculptural symbols that speak to this geology, the cutting and slicing of nature that forms this river valley.

The “portals” or vertical elements that form a gateway to the Des Moines River Bridge are sculptural symbols that speak to this geology, the cutting and slicing of nature that forms this river valley.

December 2, 2014

Public Art in Greater Des Moines Targets Community Innovation Challenge

Des Moines, IA: From more than 50 submissions the Innovation Investors with the Community Foundation of Greater Des Moines have identified 4 IGNITE FINALISTS for the 2014 Challenge! A collaborative group will pitch their innovative idea to a community panel to determine the winners: first place prize of up to $30,000 and runner-up prize of up to $15,000. Winners will be announced December 4, 2014.

The idea is ART RTE (ärt raüt):
Think, “Follow the Yellow Brick Road,” with a route leading you to world-renowned art within our city, free for all to enjoy-24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. ART RTE unites 86 works of public art in Greater Des Moines with a nearly seven mile long, sustainably painted path, creating artful city sidewalks and five bold downtown intersections. The project is scalable and can expand into art pockets throughout the metro for a coordinated regional approach. ART RTE engages locals and visitors in a walkable and memorable experience. Drives economic impact to nearby businesses. Increases traffic and pedestrian safety. Leverages the existing Public Art Foundation’s geo-targeted, informational mobile app. ART RTE is innovative as it combines a unique experience with art, safety, education elements and health benefits. To date, the project is a collaboration between the Greater Des Moines Convention and Visitors Bureau, Greater Des Moines Public Art Foundation, Des Moines Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, City of Des Moines, Des Moines Police Department and Downtown Neighborhood Association. This project’s innovation is that Greater Des Moines would be the first city of its kind to combine a public art painted connector path with painted intersections. ART RTE is vibrant. Artistic. Cultural. Unique. Game changing.

This link provides more information.